PSA: “E-Shielder Security” and “CyberSec Buzz” are gangs of idiotic scum

This is a public service announcement: E-Shielder Security, describing itself as “leading importers and suppliers of high end electronic technology solution systems” is a gang of idiotic scum.

Yesterday they posted a Hacktivists on the rampage in 2017, which largely reproduced my Hacker Archetypes post.

They did so in obvious ignorance of who the hackers I was referring to actually are, going off on a tear about “hacktivists”. That term is, in general, a flare-lit clue that the person using it is either an idiot or a vandal trying to cloak destructive behavior in respectability – real hackers are proud of what they do, take responsibility for it, and don’t wear masks (with a limited exception for those under direct threat from totalitarian governments). In this case it was clearly idiocy.

Mere idiocy turned into something nastier. I left a comment on the post pointing out their error, something I had clear standing to do as the author of the article they were quoting.

The comment was suppressed. That was scummy behavior; thus “idiotic scum”.

Don’t do business with these clowns. Warn your friends. Propagate this widely, the clowns deserve some serious reputation damage.

Addendum: Title amended because the article may have originated at CyberSec Buzz, another ‘security’ blog run by drivelheads who obviously have no fscking idea what they’re talking about. It has been taken down where I originally found it.

17 thoughts on “PSA: “E-Shielder Security” and “CyberSec Buzz” are gangs of idiotic scum

  1. They attributed it to you, but utterly distorted the context for their own gain. Scummy, indeed!

    Off topic: I love the edit timer functionality. I always catch the typo 30 seconds after posting.

  2. They spelled BOTH your names wrong. “Susan Son and Eric Raymon (here )…”.

  3. I just let a comment, which awaits moderation. We’ll see.

    There it is:
    I am one of the commenters on the original thread.
    This article is clueless and misleading.

    My professional opinion, as a business owner with 15 years of experience in the IT field, and professionally involved in data IT-related risks management is that the author has no clue about security, or hackers.

    That being said, the original thread is quite interesting, but is centered on developers, and not “black hat hackers”.

    The best which could be done to salvage that article is to put the beginning and the conclusion about “hacktivists” to the bin, as it doesn’t bring anything to anybody.
    The middle part, if the author would read the original thread, could be amended.

    My name is available to the website’s admin, as it is in my email.

  4. Are you sure both E-Shielder domains are related?

    The blog looks like your regular blogspammmer.

  5. I read at the bottom of the “E-Shielder” page, “The post Hacktivists on the rampage in 2017 appeared first on Cyber Security Buzz .”

    So, going to Cyber Security Buzz (don’t bother), specifically their “About Us” page, led me to their sponsor “Expert Marketing Insight”.

    This last is a self-described provider of “B2B Marketing for Technology Companies”, offering “Strategy & Positioning”, “Thought Leadership”, “Product Marketing”, “Sales Enablement”, “Lead Nurturing”, and “Employer Branding”. IOW, no better snake oil than most “SEO optimizers” or any other cyber-hucksters.

    Mind you, I appreciate that marketing and sales are vital functions for any organization. You’ve got to make yourself known, and explain why you’re to be preferred over your competition (even if the competition is just for mindshare and not $$$). But a bunch of sockpuppet link aggregation sites, troweled over with buzzword bafflegab, just to pimp your ` `expertise’ ‘, is less than worthless.

    Shame them, boycott them, ALL.

  6. As a former CEO of mine once quipped: “For $24, you, too, can become a widely known data analysis expert.” (He considered this all a bunch of hype, too.) The sad thing to me here is that this is often the easiest way for a newcomer to get their name spread, including newcomers with clue, which means “seen on Cyber Security Buzz” can’t be relied on as meaning “bunk”; every once in a while, you might see an informed piece. So it’s no better than chance.

    Meanwhile:

    “E-Shielder Security” is a gang of idiotic scum

    …huh. Not quite up to the level of considered harmful…

  7. At a guess, these are one-or-two-man-shops who used a VA to provide content for the website. This is the quality work you generally get from the $5/hr over-seas VAs, hence my guess.

  8. A public shaming by a tribal elder can work wonders ;)

    Their site looks like a stereotypical shonky Indian shitwagon

  9. ESR’s G+ post on issue:
    New blog post: Dealing some sell-deserved reputation damage.?

    Typo, deliberate piss-take, or column C? It seems to fit pretty well as-is, though.

  10. Are you sure they’re the origin of the article? It’s apparently been taken down, so I can’t tell if there’s any indication of it being taken from elsewhere, but apparently the same article is at cybersec.buzz/hacktivists-on-the-rampage-in-2017 (with also no indication of it being taken from elsewhere).

  11. >Are you sure they’re the origin of the article?

    Thanks, I’ve amended the post to call out both gangs of idiots.

  12. Didn’t get a chance to read the article but I am pretty sure you that they (E-Shielder Security) knew nothing about hackers or about the culture. And probably still don’t.

    Hacker culture is pretty invisible at least at schools/colleges in India (and also for a large section software industry). Almost a year ago when RMS visited one of the top engineering college on their event as a speaker, students/audience there knew nothing about him (him as in a hacker or about the role of FSF or GNU). Even he had to (defend and) teach to them what a hacker is. In fact their host (hostess, if I remember correctly) even mispronounced GNU; pronounced it letter by letter.

  13. Kinda makes you wonder why people like this don’t get doxxed.

    (*NOT* that I recommend this, by the way.)

    (Edit: still not crazy about the 5-minute window edit. What if my edit takes longer than that?)

  14. @Paul Brinkley – type faster, you slacktivist ;)

    The Indian site is yet another shitty example of content thieves, fraudulently trying to make themselves look authoritative by stealing content and not giving any legit attribution.

    Look at the other articles on their site…compare the language used to the hobbled ‘inglish’ you can find elsewhere on the site – do you believe any of it is their content? They just blagged the articles from wherever…businessinsider.com etc

  15. From the OP:

    That term is, in general, a flare-lit clue that the term using it…

    Did you mean “…that the person using it…”?

  16. I have never heard about them. It is not exactly sure what is worse for them, obscurity or notoriety. Generating bad publicity is not necessarily a suitable punishment, there are major showbiz lines of though who claim there is no such thing, only publicity. You generated bad publicity to something obscure. That is not necessarily a disincentive.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *